CoDrone – A Programmable Drone for Education – Ch 1

CoDrone is the world’s first programmable drone developed for teaching programming and drone technology in the schools. CoDrone, in its simplest form, can be controlled by a programmable remote or can be programmed directly to perform engaging and fun activities.

With available add-on modules, you can create advanced programs like making the drone to follow you or engage yourself in a laser battle with your friends’ drones.

CoDrone can be coded using Snap, Arduino, Python, and Javascript. So, you have many programming languages to learn from a single kit!

CoDrone was designed by Robolink, a robotics / STEM Kit company from the USA founded in 2012. This tiny, light-weighted quadcopter houses a bunch of sensors onboard: gyroscope, barometer, and optical flow sensor. Bluetooth 4.0 provides hassle-free wireless connectivity with the drone from remote or PC.

CoDrone programming blocks let you access the individual sensor data and build applications involving complex motion of the drone.

You can visit our CoDrone collection – www.pakronics.com.au/codrone

SNAP Programming Tool:

Step 1: Download

Download the zip file (RBCoDrone_Win64_1.1.7.zip) from the location: https://drive.google.com/drive/u/1/folders/1PqcIyS76zb2YQ_RlnDizSRdP-h9SmNeR 

Step 2: Extract

Extract the ZIP file you just downloaded, to the folder that you want to have SNAP installed on. You may want to make a new folder specifically for Snap and extract everything to that folder!

You will be notified of the extraction progress!

Step 3: Run the app

Once the extraction is complete, you will see a folder with RBCodrone.exe (our SNAP application) file in it. You can launch the SNAP tool by clicking RBCodrone.exe. With this step, you are ready to practise graphical programming.  

Some anti-virus systems may block .exe files from being downloaded. Please ensure all files (especially the RBCodrone.exe file) are downloaded and extracted correctly.

SNAP is a graphical programming tool, similar to Scratch. The instructions or functions are available as jig-saw puzzle like blocks that can be connected to form a program. Before we start to create graphical programs, we need to install the SNAP tool.

SNAP Installation Guide

SNAP is a graphical programming tool, similar to Scratch. The instructions or functions are available as jig-saw puzzle like blocks that can be connected to form a program. The functional or instruction blocks are grouped into categories based on purpose they solve. This categorized grouping is also called function library. 

The functional or instruction blocks are grouped into categories based on purpose they solve. This categorized grouping is also called function library. The libraries and their blocks are located on the left side of the tool. Workspace area or “Script” tab in the middle is where you can drag-n-drop these individual blocks from the library to create your program.

A graphical program with sprite can be tested on the top-right rectangular area (where you would see an arrow). A typical program is shown here –> 

The File Menu on the SNAP tool offers you multiple options to work with program and libraries.

For example, you can create a new program from scratch and save it for later re-use. You can save the program on your computer or on cloud drive (you need to have login credentials).

A program can also be saved as an XML file on your computer locally. You can open a previously saved program anytime to edit or run it.

It is a good practice to keep saving your program intermittently and at the completion to backup your work.COMPLETE & CONTINUE

SNAP is a graphical programming tool, similar to Scratch. The instructions or functions are available as jig-saw puzzle like blocks that can be connected to form a program. The functional or instruction blocks are grouped into categories based on purpose they solve. This categorized grouping is also called function library. 

The functional or instruction blocks are grouped into categories based on purpose they solve. This categorized grouping is also called function library. The libraries and their blocks are located on the left side of the tool. Workspace area or “Script” tab in the middle is where you can drag-n-drop these individual blocks from the library to create your program.

A graphical program with sprite can be tested on the top-right rectangular area (where you would see an arrow). A typical program is shown here –> 

The File Menu on the SNAP tool offers you multiple options to work with program and libraries.

For example, you can create a new program from scratch and save it for later re-use. You can save the program on your computer or on cloud drive (you need to have login credentials).

A program can also be saved as an XML file on your computer locally. You can open a previously saved program anytime to edit or run it.

It is a good practice to keep saving your program intermittently and at the completion to backup your work.

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